Civil War Vets

Tabernacle (Shamong) men in the Civil War buried in the Old Tabernacle Cemetery, the Junior Order of American Mechanics Cemetery and the African American Cemetery or, soldiers who were from Tabernacle (Shamong)

Amos Alloway (1841-1909) (row 9, lot 5)

Unit: Private Co. F, NJ 23rd infantry regiment

1890 Veterans Census schedule: Amos lives in Asbury Park, NJ

1890 Invalid pension filing: Application number 778953 and certificate number 619614

1880 Census: Amos is living in Neptune, NJ with no occupation listed.

1870 Census: Amos lives with his parents and siblings in Shamong. He is a farm laborer.

1865 Census: In Shamong, he resides with his mother.

From Find a Grave: Civil war Union Army Soldier. He served as a Private in Company F, 23rd New Jersey Volunteer Infantry, being mustered in on August 27th 1862 and being mustered out on June 27, 1863.

Charles L Bowker (1829-1905)(row 8 lot 4)

Unit: Private Co. C and I, NJ 5th infantry regiment

1900 Census: Charles lives with wife Sarah and sons Alfred and Lewis in Shamong. He is a pensioner. The boys are farm laborers. Now 70 years old, he and Sarah have been married for 34 years and had seven children.

1890 Veterans Census schedule: Charles receives a $10 per month pension and resides in the Tabernacle postal area.

1880 Census: Charles and Sarah live in Shamong with their seven children. He is a charcoal maker.

1866 Invalid pension filing: Application number 112779 and certificate number 94872.

From Find a Grave: Civil War Union Soldier. He was mustered in as a Private in Company I, 5th New Jersey Volunteer Infantry on October 9, 1861. He served a full three years of duty in the field, and was honorably discharged on November 26, 1864. He applied for a US Army Pension on August 2, 1866 (Application #112779, Certificate #94872).

Charles Bozarth (died in Washington hospital, burial unknown)

John Wesley Budden (1829-1897) (section A, row 55, lot 4) (row 53, lot 6)

Units: Private Co. A, NJ 10th infantry regiment and Private Co. E, NJ 23rd infantry regiment

Richard Burke (1845-1892) (row 25, lot 3)

Unit: Private Co. F, NJ 38th vols. He served 14 Sep 1864-30 Jan 1865.

1892 Widow’s pension filing: Application number 544734 and application number 348880.

1890 Veterans Census schedule: Richard is noted and can be reached via the Tabernacle post office.

1888 Invalid pension filing: Application number 675956. No certificate number, as Richard had probably passed away.

1880 Census: The couple lives in Shamong with children George 11, Ella 8 and Josephine 5. Richard is a farmer.

1870 Census: Richard lives with Sarah and son George in Shamong. He is a farm laborer.

George Chisom (1840-1911) (section B, row 24, lot 2) (row 23, lot 1 ½)

Unit: US Navy

Widow’s pension filing: Application number 24508 and certificate number 21141.

Invalid pension filing: Application number 963292 and certificate number 724683.

1910 Census: George lives on “Englishtown Road” with his wife Ellen and son George Jr. He is 69 years old and has been married for 42 years. No occupation is listed and his income is “own,” probably a war pension.

1900 Census: George lives on Headley Street in Philadelphia with his wife and son George. He is an “Ingineer Stat.”

1890 Veterans Census schedule: George lives in Philadelphia on Nassau near several other sailors.

1863 Enlistment rendezvous: Joined the Navy in Philadelphia.

From Burlington County Library index: Name: Chisom, George 
Death Date: Apr 3, 1911 Burial Date: Apr 6, 1911 
Place of Burial/Cemetery: Tabernacle Cemetery 
Plat No.: Sec B, Lot 2, Row 24 
Publication: Burlington County WPA Veterans Grave Registration Cards
Of Tabernacle. U.S. Navy 

Ira Crain (1835-1898) (section A, row 58, lot 3) (row 57 lot 3)

Unit: Private Co. F, NJ 23 infantry regiment

1898 Widow’s pension filing: Application number is 680758 and certificate number is 481079.

1890 Veterans Census schedule: Ira uses an Indian Mills postal address.

1890 Invalid pension filing: Application number is 955910 and certificate number is 785892.

1880 Census: Ira is a carpenter living in Shamong with his wife Jerusha and children Lewis 19, Albert 10 and Sarah 7.

1860 Census: Ira and Jerusha live in Shamong with children Hester 2 and Charles Lewis 1 month. Ira is a farmer.

From Find a Grave: Civil War Union Soldier. He enrolled in Company F, 23rd New Jersey Volunteer Infantry on August 27, 1863, and was mustered in as a Private on September 16, 1862 (his name is listed as “Ira Crane” in New Jersey Adjutant General records). He served through the December 1862 Fredericksburg Campaign, and the May 1863 Chancellorsville Campaign, and was honorably mustered out on June 27, 1863.
He and his wife Jerusha were the parents of 6 children.

William Dennis (1832-1912) (section B, row 10, lot 4) (row 9, lot 5)

Units: Private Co. H, NJ 29th infantry regiment and Private Co. G, NJ 10th infantry regiment

1890 Veterans Census schedule: William lives in Manchester, NJ and suffers from “diseased back.”

1881 Invalid pension filing: Application number is 422379 and certificate number is 881571

1880 Census: William lives in Southampton Township with wife Demaries and children Charles 19, Abraham 13 and Elvina 10. He is a day laborer.

1870 Census: William and Demaries live with children Elizabeth 13, Charles 11, William 8, Abraham 3 and Elvina 1 in Southampton. He is a laborer.

1860 Census: William and Demaries live with William’s mother Hannah in Southampton. With them is two year old daughter Jane (maybe Elizabeth?). William is a wood chopper.

1850 Census: William lives with parents John and Hannah as well as brother Charles.

From Find a Grave: Civil War Union Soldier. He was enrolled in the 29th New Jersey Volunteer Infantry on August 29, 1862, and was mustered in as a Private in Company H on September 20, 1862. He served a nine-month enlistment in the field, and was honorably mustered out on June 30, 1863. 
He was then mustered in as a draftee Private in Company G, 10th New Jersey Volunteer Infantry on November 30, 1864. He served through the conclusion of the conflict, and was honorably mustered out on July 1, 1865.

George H Eares(Ayres)(Eyres) (1831?-1895?)(African American Cemetery)

Unit: Private Co. E, NJ 25th regiment, US Colored troops

1880 Invalid pension filing: Application number is 392663.

1880 Census: George is 54 and lives with his four children (Joseph 23, Edward 19, George 17 and Rachel 15), as well as his mother Caroline age 77. He is a farmer.

1870 Census: George is 39 and lives with his wife and five children (Joseph 13, Edward 8, George 6, Rachel 3 and Caroline 5 months). He is a farm laborer.

From Find a Grave: Enlisted 1/23/1864 and discharged 12/6/1865.1860 Census: George is 32 and lives with his wife Lueresin and son Joseph, age 3. He is a laborer.

Jacob Emmons (1841-1900) (row 37, lot 3)

Unit: Private Co. F, NJ 40th infantry regiment

1900 Widow’s pension filing: Application number is 718555 and certificate number is 582245.

1890 Veterans Census schedule: Jacob is now living in Medford.

1888 Invalid pension filing: Application number is 668592 and certificate number is 685753

1880 Census: Jacob and his wife Mary, and their five children live in Shamong. He is a farmer.

1870 Census: Jacob resides with the George Wills family in Shamong and is a farm laborer.

1863 Draft registration: Now 23 and an unmarried laborer, he lives in Tulpahockin (Shamong).

1850 Census: Jacob lives with his parents and siblings in Southampton Township.

From Find a Grave: Civil War Union Soldier. He was mustered in as a Private in Company F, 40th New Jersey Volunteer Infantry on February 4, 1865. He served through the conclusion of the conflict, and was discharged at the Douglass United States Army General Hospital in Washington, DC, on June 16, 1865.

Frank Gardner (1837-1905) (row 55, lot 5)

Unit: Private Co. C, NJ 1st Calvary

1905 Widow’s pension filing: Application number is 831618 and certificate number is 608083.

1900 Census: The family, now with children Frank, Lena and Anna Mae, live in Southampton. Now a woodcutter, Frank is 62 years old and has been married for 36 years.

1880 Census: Frank and Elizabeth live in Southampton with their children Samuel, Willie, Amanda, Hattie and John. Frank works on a farm.

1870 Census: Frank and Elizabeth live in Shamong with children Samuel 11 and Elizabeth 8. He is a farm laborer.

1867 Invalid pension filing: Application number is 128585 and certificate number is 87239.

From Find a Grave: The Burlington County WPA Veterans Grave Registration Cards describe Frank Garner as of Tabernacle, Civil War Veteran, Private Co. 1st NJ Cav., enlisted 8/17/1861, discharged 9/16/1864. 

He also went by Franklin, Frank H., and H. Frank. Some census and some Civil War records records show his surname as Gardner, Gardener, and Gardinor, etc. Some of Frank Garners descendants in Burlington county use the surname Gardner, however the cemetery and veterans records below show he was buried as Frank Garner, Sr. Some US Census records indicate his year of birth as 1845, however, the 1900 US Census states Frank / Franklin was born in July 1837. US Census Records show Frank resided in the Southampton and Shamong area of Burlington County before and after the Civil War, and worked as a farm laborer. It seems that he married Elizabeth Rogers upon returning from the war, and he and Elizabeth were the parents of at least 11 children.

Gilbert Knight (1832-1874) (row 8, lot 1)

Units: Private Co. C, NJ 34th infantry regiment and Corporal Co. F, NJ 23rd infantry regiment

1890 Veterans Census schedule: Gilbert’s wife Elizabeth is listed and is reachable through the Tabernacle post office. Services for him no longer needed and she is applying for a pension.

1870 Census: Gilbert is a blacksmith in Shamong. With him is his second wife Elizabeth and children Mary Emma 15, Annie 13, George 11 and Harry 2.

1860 Census: Gilbert lives with his first wife Hannah and their children Mary 6, Anna 4 and George 1. He is a blacksmith in Shamong.

1850 Census: Gilbert is living in Philadelphia with a blacksmith. He probably ia an apprentice.

From Find a Grave: Civil War Union Soldier. He was enrolled in the 23rd New Jersey Volunteer Infantry on August 27, 1862, and was mustered in as a Corporal in Company F on September 13, 1862. He served through the December 1862 Fredericksburg Campaign, and the May 1863 Chancellorsville Campaign, and was honorably mustered out on June 27, 1863. He re-entered the Union war effort over a year later when he was mustered in as a recruit Private in Company C, 34th New Jersey Volunteer Infantry on September 8, 1864. He served through the conclusion of the conflict, and was honorably discharged at Montgomery, Alabama on June 6, 1865.

1890 Widow’s pension filing: Application number is 424654 and certificate number is 365533.

Andrew D Lull (1843-1895)(block 2, row 23, lot 2, grave 4) (row 23 lot 2)

Unit: Private Co. E, NY 144th Volunteers

1884 Invalid pension filing: Application number is 518610 and certificate number is 463465.

1880 Census: Andrew is a farmer living in Woodland Township with his wife Annie and children Sybel 7, Willie 5, Ida 3 and Deloris 1. Also in the household is his mother Martha age 59.

1870 Census: Andrew lives with his parents William and Martha in Woodland Township. Also in the family of farmers are his six siblings.

1865 Census: Andrew, his parents and siblings are farmers in Bovina, NY. He is listed as being in the Army.

From Find a Grave: Civil War Union Soldier. He was enrolled in the 144th New York Volunteer Infantry on August 28, 1862 at the age of 19, and was mustered in as a Private in Company E on September 27th 1862. He then served the full balance of the war in the field, and was honorably mustered out at Hilton Head, South Carolina on June 25, 1865.

Harry Myers (1848-1903) (section A, row 34, lot 1) (row 34, lot 3)

Unit: Private Co. H, NJ 3rd infantry regiment

1926 Pension filing: Though not listed as a widow’s pension filing, it probably is. Only an application number (1547381) is shown so it may not have been granted.

1900 Census: Harry and wife Sarah, as well as their six children, live in Southampton Township. He is a farmer.

1885 Census: Harry, along with his wife Sarah and three children, live in Southampton Township.

From Burlington County Library index: Name: Myers, Harry Death Date: Nov 17, 1903 
Burial Date: Nov 20, 1903 Place of Burial/Cemetery: Tabernacle Cemetery 
Plat No.: Sec A, Lot 1, Row 34 Publication: Burlington County WPA Veterans Grave Registration Cards of Tabernacle.

Andrew J Parks (1844-1913) (row 29, lot 2)

Unit: Private Co. H, Georgia 19th infantry – enlisted 29 Jun 1861.

1910 Census: Andrew (now 65) lives on Tabernacle Road in Southampton. He does odd jobs for a living. With him are his second wife (age 32) and two children, Albert and Virginia.

1900 Census: Born in Georgia, Andrew is a Shamong farm laborer. With him are children Andrew, Alice, Rebecca, Chalkley, William and George.

1880 Census: Andrew lives in Shamong with his wife Virginia 30 and children James 12, Andrew 8, Wilber 5 and Mary 1. He is a farmer.

1870 Census: A farm laborer in Shamong, Andrew resides with his wife and children James 2 and William 3 months.

Caleb Rodgers (1823-1898)(row 19, lot 3)

Unit: Private Co. C, NJ 34th infantry regiment. He served 26 Aug 1867-26 May 1868.

1907 Widow’s pension filing: Application number 878746 and certificate number 647996.

1898 Invalid pension filing: Application number is 1208764. No certificate number, probably due to his death.

1890 Veterans Census: Caleb is listed along with the Tabernacle post office.

1880 Census: Caleb and Ester live with son George in Shamong. He is a farm laborer.

1870 Census: Caleb and Ester live with children Joseph 17, Charles 8, Franklin 6 and George 1 in Shamong. He is a farm laborer.

1865 Census: Caleb and Ester live in Shamong.

1863 Draft: Caleb lives “near Tabernacle,” is 20 years old and a farm laborer.

Anthony Shearer (1827-1897)(section A, row 61, lot 1) (row 62, lot 4)

Units: Private Co. B, PA 72nd volunteers and Private Co. H, PA 183rd regiment. He enlisted 25 Aug 1862.

1890 Veterans Census schedule: Anthony is listed for Tabernacle post office and is “applying for pension.”

Charles Smith (JOUAM Cemetery)

James Snow (1827-1900) (section A, row 37, lot 1) (row 37, lot 5)

Unit: Corporal Co. G, NJ 4th Volunteers and Co. B 192nd Pa infantry.

1900 Census: In a census taken just nine days before his death, James (listed as Hugh) is noted as a Shamong farmer. With him are wife Angeline and children Elva and Herbert. All will be interred in the Tabernacle Cemetery.

1890 Veterans Census schedule: James lives in Randolph Township and uses the Green Bank post office.

1890 Invalid pension filing: Application number is 421864 and certificate number is 301877.

1880 Census: In an entry for Randolph Township a James Snow and Mary (first wife?) live in Randolph Township with three sons. He is a farmer.

From Find a Grave: Civil War Union Soldier. A veteran of the Mexican war, he was mustered in as a Private in Company G, 4th New Jersey Volunteer Infantry on November 21, 1861. Promoted to Corporal in May 10, 1862, he served until he was discharged due to disability at Alexandria, Virginia on November 29, 1862.

Isaac Taylor (-1892) (section B, row 19, lot 2) (row 18, lot 1)

Unit: Private Co. G, NJ 4th Volunteers

1894 Minor pension filing: Application number is 605564 and certificate number is 624784.

1892 Widow’s pension filing: Application number is 563830 and certificate number is 362770.

1890 Veterans Census schedule: Isaac lives in Medford Township and suffers from “chronic hemorrhoids.”

1890 Invalid pension filing: Application number is 830132 and certificate number is 624784.

From Find a Grave: Civil War Union Soldier. He was mustered in as a recruit Private in Company C, 34th New Jersey Volunteer Infantry on September 6, 1864. He served through the end of the war, and was discharged at Montgomery, Alabama on June 6, 1865.

Joseph Tetlow (1840-1863) (section A, row 55 or 56, lot 1) (moved to Pennsylvania))

Unit: Private Co. F, NJ 23rd infantry regiment

While Joseph had a tombstone in Tabernacle Cemetery in 1938, he remains have been moved to West Laurel Hill Cemetery in Bala Cynwyd, PA. His tombstone there states he died of wounds received in the battle of Fredericksburg. The PA Veterans burial card states the information regarding his reinternment was provided on 3rd of April, 1936.

There does not appear to be any other “Tetlows” buried in Tabernacle Cemetery. However, among those buried within his new plot is Martha Kemble Tetlow (1841-1901). Since she married in 1863 to Henry Tetlow (born 1838), Joseph may have been a brother in law to her.

From Find a Grave: Civil War Union Soldier. He was enrolled in the 23rd New Jersey Volunteer Infantry on August 27, 1862, and was mustered in as a Private in Company F on September 13, 1862. He fought in the December 13, 1863 Battle of Fredericksburg, where he was mortally wounded. He died of those wounds at the 1st Division United States Army General Hospital in Alexandria, Virginia on January 2, 1863.

Samuel Warner (1832-1928) (section A, row 50, lot 2) (row 50, lot 2)

Units: Corporal Co. C, NJ 23rd infantry regiment and Corporal Co. C, NJ 12th infantry regiment

1920 Census: Samuel is now a carpenter by trade and continues to live with his son’s family. They live on Branch Street in Medford.

1910 Census: Samuel now lives with his son’s family on Main Road in Tabernacle. He is 67 and a farm laborer.

1900 Census: Married for 32 years, Sam and Annie reside in Shamong with their 21 year old son Thomas. Sam is a farmer and just three of his seven children are still alive.

1890 Veterans Census schedule: Samuel resides in Shamong with a Tabernacle postal address.

1881 Invalid pension filing: Application number is 434496 and certificate number is 979322.

1880 Census: Both Sam and Annie are listed as servants in the household of Joseph Mathis, a Shamong farmer. With them is son Edward, age 3.

1870 Census: Sam is a farm laborer and lives with wife Annie and son Wilbert, eight months old, in Shamong.

From Find a Grave: Civil War Union Soldier. He was enrolled in the 23rd New Jersey Volunteer Infantry on August 26, 1862, and was mustered in as a Private in Company C on September 13, 1862. He served through the December 1862 Fredericksburg Campaign, and the May 1863 Chancellorsville Campaign, and was honorably mustered out on June 27, 1863.

Corporal, Company C, 12th New Jersey Infantry, MI as recruit Private 01/02/1864, promoted Corporal 06/05/1865, MO: 07/15/1865

David Wells (-1889) (row 10, lot 3)

Unit: Private Co. C, NJ 34th infantry regiment

1890 Veterans Census schedule: David’s widow is applying for a pension. Her post office is Indian Mills.

1890: Widow’s pension filing: Application number is 414417 and certificate number is 299775.

1880 Census: David is 45 and resides with his 36 year old wife Patience, in Shamong. With them are children Rose 10 and Lewis 6. He is a day laborer.

1870 Census: Louis 9, Daniel 5 and Rosanna 1 live with their parents in Shamong. David is a 36 year old farmer while wife Patience is 26.

From Find a Grave: Civil War Union Soldier. He was mustered in as a recruit Private in Company C, 34th New Jersey Volunteer Infantry on September 9, 1864. He served through the conclusion of the conflict, and was honorably discharged at Montgomery, Alabama on June 9, 1865.

The following histories are taken from Wikipedia

New Jersey 3rd Volunteer Infantry

Harry Myers

The 3rd New Jersey Volunteer Infantry was an American Civil War Union Army regiment of infantry from New Jersey that served in the Army of the Potomac.

It was recruited and mustered into Federal service in May 1861, and was brigaded with the 1st New Jersey Volunteer Infantry, the 2nd New Jersey Volunteer Infantry, and the 4th New Jersey Volunteer Infantry to make up what became famed as the “First New Jersey Brigade“. Early on, the regiment participated in small actions such as the Bog Wallow Ambush in Northern Virginia. The regiment and brigade served as the 1st Brigade of the 1st Division of the VI Corps, and participated in numerous battles from the June 27, 1862, Battle of Gaines MillVirginia, to the final Union assaults on Confederate positions at Petersburg, Virginia, in April 1865.

The remnants of the 3rd New Jersey Volunteer Infantry were mustered out in June 1865.

New Jersey 4th Volunteer Infantry

James Snow (12 Nov 1861 – 29 Nov 1862)

Isaac Taylor (6 Sep 1864 – 6 Jun 1865)

The 4th New Jersey Infantry was reorganized at Camp Olden in Trenton for three years service on August 19, 1861 under the command of Colonel James H. Simpson.

The regiment was attached to Kearney’s Brigade, Division of the Potomac, to October 1861. Kearney’s Brigade, Franklin’s Division, Army of the Potomac, to March 1862. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, I CorpsArmy of the Potomac, to April 1862. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, Department of the Rappahannock, to May 1862. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, VI Corps, Army of the Potomac and Army of the Shenandoah, to July 1865.

The regiment was surrounded at Gaines Mill and most of its men taken prisoner. After the Seven Days Battles, they were freed by the Confederate authorities in a prisoner exchange. The 4th New Jersey had been armed with M1861 Springfield rifles, however upon returning from captivity, the authorities in Washington had no rifled muskets to rearm the regiment with, thus they were given outdated .69 smoothbore muskets. The regiment was forced to use them until the Battle of South Mountain in September, when they rearmed themselves with Enfield rifles dropped by retreating Confederates.

New Jersey 5th Volunteer Infantry

Charles L Bowker (9 Oct 1861 – 26 Nov 1864)

The 5th New Jersey Volunteer Infantry was one of four regiments formed by Governor Charles Olden upon requisition of President Abraham Lincoln on July 24, 1861. The regiment departed for  Washington, DC on August 24, 1861, and camped at Meridian Hill.

Engagements:

Siege of Yorktown (1862), Battle of Williamsburg, Battle of Fair Oaks & Darbytown Road, Battle of Seven Pines, Battle of Savage’s Station, Battle of Glendale, Battle of Malvern Hill, Battle of Bristoe Station, Second Battle of Bull Run, Battle of Chantilly, Battle of Fredericksburg, Battle of Chancellorsville, Battle of Gettysburg, Battle of Manassas Gap, Battle of McLean’s Ford, Battle of Mine Run, Battle of the Wilderness, Battle of Spotsylvania, Battle of North Anna, Battle of Totopotomoy Creek, Battle of Cold Harbor, Siege of Petersburg, First Battle of Deep Bottom, Battle of the Crater (mine explosion), Second Battle of Deep Bottom, Battle of Fort Sedgwick (Sept 10, 1864), Battle of Peebles’ Farm, Battle of Boydton Plank Road

NJ 10th Volunteer Infantry

John Wesley Budden (18 Oct 1861 – 27 May 1862)

William Dennis (17 Nov 1864 – 17 Jan 1865)

The 10th New Jersey Volunteer Infantry was a regiment was organized under the provisions of an Act of Congress approved July 22, 1861, and by authority issued by the War Department. It was created to recruit from residents of the State of New Jersey, but was not under the control or supervision of the State authorities.[1] It was originally known as “Olden Legion” after New Jersey Governor Charles Olden.[1]

William Bryan of Beverly, New Jersey, recruited and organized the regiment. According to Foster, On the first roster of the regiment, after being placed in State service, is this endorsement: “This regiment was raised by individuals, not authorized by the State, and accepted by the War Department as an independent organization, some time in the fall of 1861, and was not known by the State authorities until it was placed under their care, January 29, 1862.”[1]

When the organization of the regiment was completed with nine companies of infantry and one company of cavalry, it was established at Camp Beverly, New Jersey, where William Bryan lived. The unit proceeded to Washington, D.C., on December 26, 1861, with 35 officers, 883 non-commissioned officers and privates, for a total of 918 men.

After they marched to Camp Clay on the Bladensburg Turnpike, a location approximately one mile from Washington, they were reorganized and designated the 10th New Jersey Infantry. Soon after being reorganized the cavalry company, Company D, was discharged and a new company was raised that April. In fact, the regiment was not very effective by February 1862 when many of the cavalry company were under arrest for refusing to do infantry duties.[2]

For the next year, the regiment served under the command of Brig. Gen. James Wadsworth[3] in the defenses of Washington before being assigned to field service in the XXII Corps until April 1863.

According to Foster this regiment suffered from defective organization and the absence of discipline[4] soon after arriving in Washington. The War Department turned to Governor Olden who did not want responsibility for this problem regiment. In the end, however, the State accepted responsibility after reorganizing the regiment and assigning a new Colonel, William R. Murphy.

NJ 12th Volunteer Infantry

Samuel Warner (2 Jan 1864 – 15 Jul 1865)

The regiment was organized at Camp Stockton in Woodbury, New Jersey, in the summer of 1862 in response to President Abraham Lincoln‘s call for an additional 300,000 men for the Union Army. After training through the summer, it was officially mustered into the Union Army in September.

After the end of the Battle of Gettysburg and the subsequent pursuit of the Confederate Army, the regiment was assigned to duty on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad. This lasted until September 12, when it was part of an advance from the Rapidan to the Rappahannock River. The regiment then participated in the Bristoe and Mine Run campaigns, the latter ending on December 2. Afterward, the regiment encamped for the winter at Stevensburg, Virginia, until May 3, 1864.

After wintering, the regiment was a part of the newly promoted Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant‘s southern attack in the Battle of the Wilderness. Although the regiment was not fully engaged during this battle, it took serious casualties, with one officer killed and several others wounded. It then participated in the Battle of Spotsylvania Court House, where it suffered similarly. Lieutenant Colonel Davis, one of the wounded from the Wilderness, led the regiment in this battle and was killed. Command was assumed by Captain McCoomb, who was subsequently killed during the Battle of Cold Harbor. Moving on with Grant’s southern push, the regiment was a part of the Siege of Petersburg from June 16 to April 2, 1865. Soon afterward, it was present at Battle of Appomattox Court House and Robert E. Lee’s surrender to Grant.

After the surrender, the regiment marched to Washington, D.C., and served duty there until it officially mustered out on July 15. Over the course of the war, 9 of the regiment’s officers and 168 of its enlisted men were killed or suffered mortal wounds, and 99 enlisted men died from disease.

NJ 23rd Volunteer Infantry

Amos Alloway (13 Sep 1862 – 27 Jun 1863)

John Wesley Budden

Ira Crain

Gilbert Knight (27 Aug 1862 – 13 Sep 1862)

Joseph Tetlow (3 Sep 1862 – KIA)

Samuel Warner (26 Aug 1862 – 27 Jun 1863)

The 23rd New Jersey Volunteer Infantry was an American Civil War infantry regiment from New Jersey that served a nine-month enlistment in the Union Army.

It was recruited from various towns within Burlington County, New Jersey, and was mustered into Federal service in August 1862. The regiment trained at Camp Cadwalader in Beverly, before being sent out to join the Army of the Potomac. There, it was brigaded with the New Jersey units that made up the famed “First New Jersey Brigade“, which had been reduced to a shadow of its former self due to continual field service and participation in the Battles of Gaines MillSecond Bull Run, and South Mountain. The arrival of the nearly 1,000-strong 23rd New Jersey and the newly recruited three-year 15th New Jersey Volunteer Infantry greatly replenished the brigade’s numbers.

When the 23rd New Jersey’s first commander, Colonel John S. Cox, resigned to prevent a court-martial for drunkenness in November 1862, the new commander, Col. Henry O. Ryerson (the former Lieutenant Colonel of the 2nd New Jersey Volunteer Infantry), reviewed the regiment, and disparagingly called them “Yahoos“, due to their less than military demeanor and irreverence. The men of the regiment took to the sobriquet, emblazoning it on their regimental flag, and called themselves Yahoos for the rest of their lives.

The regiment fought in two engagements–the December 1862 Battle of Fredericksburg, and the May 1863 Battle of Salem Church. Years after the war was over, the regiment erected a monument—the only one ever erected for a nine-month New Jersey unit—on the Salem Church battlefield, where it stands today. In that engagement, it was led by Col. Edward Burd Grubb, Jr., who took over command when Colonel Ryerson left to lead the 10th New Jersey Volunteer Infantry in March 1863.

After serving its nine-month enlistment, the regiment was mustered out in June 1863. Many of the veterans of the 23rd New Jersey went on to serve in other regiments, most notably the 34th New Jersey Volunteer Infantry, which is attributed to the fact that Colonel Grubb, much respected by the Yahoos, was rumored to be the commander of the unit (he in fact went on to command the 37th New Jersey Volunteer Infantry instead).

Captain Forrester L. Taylor, commander of Company H, rescued two wounded soldiers while under intense fire from the Confederates during the Salem Church engagement, an act of bravery that would get him awarded the Medal of Honor. This made him one of only two men from New Jersey’s 11 nine-month enlistment regiments to be awarded that high honor (the other being Sergeant Major Amos J. Cummings of the 26th New Jersey Volunteer Infantry).

NJ 34th Volunteer Infantry

Gilbert Knight (8 Sep 1864 – 6 Jun 1865)

David Wells ( 9 Sep 1864 – 9 Jun 1865)

The 34th New Jersey Infantry began organization at BeverlyNew Jersey, for three years service with Company A being the first to muster into the service on September 3, 1863.

The regiment was attached to District of Columbus, Kentucky, 6th Division, XVI CorpsDepartment of the Tennessee, to August 1864. District of Paducah, Kentucky, Department of the Ohio, to February 1865. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, XVI Corps, Military Division of West Mississippi, to August 1865. District of Alabama, Department of the Gulf, to April 1866.

The 34th New Jersey Infantry mustered out of service April 10, 1866, and the men were discharged at Trenton, New Jersey, on April 30, 1865.

NJ 40th Volunteer Infantry

Jacob Emmons (4 Feb 1865 – 13 Jun 1865)

The 40th New Jersey Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment raised in the state of New Jersey during the American Civil War. It was the last such unit the state raised for the conflict.

he first company of the unit was organized on October 23, 1864, but since the low enlistments numbers the companies were individually sent to the front, and were temporarily attached to the 4th New Jersey Volunteer Infantry in the First New Jersey Brigade. It was officially organized and mustered in as a whole on March 10, 1865, when the last company was sent to the front. Owing largely to high bounties paid out and a smaller pool of available men of age since the war was in its later days, the unit suffered heavy desertion rates – the highest of any New Jersey infantry regiment. Its commander, Colonel Stephen Rose Gilkyson, had previously commanded the 6th New Jersey Volunteer Infantry as a lieutenant colonel, and had several years of combat field service under his belt. Likewise, most of the 40th’s officer corps were combat veterans from previous New Jersey regiments. Due to the haphazard way the unit was organized, many officers served in their duty in the field long before they were officially mustered in.

Although the unit as it existed at the time was present at the Battle of Hatcher’s Run near Dabney’s Mills on February 5–7, 1865, the 40th New Jersey participated in their first and last battle on April 2 at Petersburg, where it participated in the final Union army assaults on Confederate entrenchments. There the unit suffered 23 wounded (2 of whom died later). Private Frank E. Fesq of Company A captured the battle flag of the 18th North Carolina Infantry during the assault, earning him the Medal of Honor.

The regiment remained in occupation duty after the Confederate surrender, then was mustered out at Hall’s Hill, Virginia, on July 13, 1865.

NJ 1st Calvary

Frank Gardner (17 Aug 1861 – 16 Sep 1864)

The 1st New Jersey Volunteer Cavalry was a regiment from the U.S. state of New Jersey that participated in the American Civil War.

Regiment lost during service 12 Officers and 116 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 4 Officers and 185 Enlisted men by disease. Total 317

The regiment was organized at Trenton, New Jersey, under authority of the United States Department of War on August 14, 1861, by William Halstead, a former congressman who served as a Colonel in the regiment.[1]
Mustered out at Cloud’s Hills, Va., July 24, 1865.

NY 144th Volunteers Infantry

Andrew Lull

The regiment was organized at Delhi, N.Y., and mustered in September 27, 1862. Left State for Washington, D.C., October 11, 1862. Attached to 3rd Brigade, Abercrombie’s Division, Defenses of Washington, to February, 1863. 3rd Brigade, Abercrombie’s Division, 22nd Army Corps, Dept. of Washington, to April, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to May, 1863. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 4th Army Corps, to July, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 11th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to August, 1863. 2nd Brigade, Gordon’s Division, Folly Island, S.C., 10th Army Corps, Dept. of the South, to February, 1864. 1st Brigade, Ames’ Division, District of Florida, to April, 1864. District of Florida, Dept. of the South, to June, 1864. District of Hilton Head, S.C., Dept. of the South, to October, 1864. 3rd Separate Brigade, Dept. of the South, to November, 1864. 1st Brigade, Coast Division, Dept. of the South, to January, 1865. 3rd Separate Brigade, District of Hilton Head, S.C., Dept. of the South, to May, 1865. Port Royal, Dept. of the South, to June, 1865.

PA 72nd Volunteers Infantry

Anthony Shearer (25 Aug 1862 – 19 Jul 1864)

The 72nd Pennsylvania Infantry (originally raised as the 3rd California) was a volunteer infantry regiment which served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. It was part of the famous Philadelphia Brigade. They wore a very Americanized zouave uniform, consisting of a zouave jacket trimmed with red without a tombeux on the jacket, sky-blue trousers with a red stripe down the leg, a sky-blue zouave vest trimmed in red, white gaiters, and a dark blue kepi. The jacket was decorated with 16 ball brass buttons down the front of the jacket, which were not part of the original French Zouave uniform.

At the Battle of Gettysburg, it defended the Angle on July 2 and 3. On the evening of the 2nd, it helped defeat Confederate Brigade General Ambrose R. Wright‘s attack, advancing just over the stone wall. The next day, it was placed in reserve for the brigade near the copse of trees. During Pickett’s Charge, its position served as a rallying point for the left wing of the 71st and two companies of the 106th Pennsylvania, which had been driven back. Despite Brigadier General Alexander S. Webb‘s best efforts, these troops refused to counterattack for several minutes. This might have been due to the 71st’s color bearers being shot down. (Civil War regiments often followed the regimental flag since orders would have been difficult to hear on the battlefield.) At Gettysburg, Col. Baxter replaced the wounded General Webb in command of the Brigade, and Lt. Col. Hesser replaced him in command of the 72nd Regiment.

The unit fought well during the Overland Campaign and in the beginning stages of the Siege of Petersburg. On June 24, 1864, the regiment was mustered out of service.

PA 183rd Volunteers Infantry

Anthony Shearer (20 Jul 1864 – 30 May 1865)

The 183rd Pennsylvania Infantry was organized at PhiladelphiaPennsylvania, beginning December 24, 1863, and continuing through March 8, 1864, under the command of Colonel George P. McClean.

The regiment was attached to 1st Brigade, 1st Division, II CorpsArmy of the Potomac, to March 1865. 4th Brigade, 1st Division, II Corps, to July 1865.

The 183rd Pennsylvania Infantry mustered out of service on July 13, 1865.

Campaign from the Rapidan to the James River, Va., May 4 – June 12, 1864. Battle of the Wilderness May 5–7; Corbin’s Bridge May 8; Spotsylvania May 8–12; Po River May 10; Spotsylvania Court House May 12–21. Assault on the Salient May 12. North Anna River May 23–26. On line of the Pamunkey May 26–28. Totopotomoy May 28–31. Cold Harbor June 1–12. Before Petersburg June 16–18. Siege of Petersburg June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Jerusalem Plank Road, Weldon Railroad, June 22–23, 1864. Demonstration north of the James at Deep Bottom July 27–29. Deep Bottom July 27–28. Mine Explosion, Petersburg, July 30 (reserve). Demonstration north of the James at Deep Bottom August 13–20. Deep Bottom, August 14–18. Ream’s Station August 25. Boydton Plank Road, October 27–28. Reconnaissance to Hatcher’s Run December 9–10. Hatcher’s Run, February 5–7, 1865. Watkins’ House March 25. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Hatcher’s Run or Boydton Road March 30–31. White Oak Road March 31. Sutherland’s Station April 2. Sailor’s Creek April 6. High Bridge, Farmville, April 7. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. March to Washington, D.C., May 2–12. Grand Review of the Armies May 23.

Georgia 19th Infantry

Andrew Parks

The 19th Infantry Regiment was assembled during the summer of 1861. Its companies were raised in Henry, Jackson, Douglas, Coweta, Carroll, Mitchell, and Bartow counties. Comprising 900 men, the unit was sent to Virginia and placed in the Potomac District. In April, 1862, it totaled 395 effectives and during the war served under the command of Generals W. Hampton, Archer, and Colquitt. The 19th fought in many battles from Seven Pines to Chancellorsville, then moved to Charleston, South Carolina, and later Florida where it took part in the conflict at Olustee. In April, 1864, it returned to Virginia and continued the fight at Proctor’s Creek and Cold Harbor and in the Petersburg lines south and north of the James River. This regiment lost 32 killed and 157 wounded during the Seven Days’ Battles, 13 killed and 76 wounded in the Maryland Campaign, and 3 killed and 40 wounded at Chancellorsville. It sustained 96 casualties at Olustee. In 1865 the unit participated in the North Carolina Campaign and surrendered with the Army of Tennessee. The field officers were Colonels William W. Boyd, Andrew J. Hutchins, and James H. Neal; Lieutenant Colonels Tilman W. Flynt, Ridgway B. Hogan, and Thomas C. Johnson; and Majors William Hamilton, John W. Hooper, and Charles W. Mabry.