The Taverns of Tabernacle

At least eight 18th and 19th century taverns or inns have been identified as within the current township’s political borders. Here is what we know about each of them. This is a work in progress and new content is added often. We are still looking at census and probate records, as well as deeds and a few other sources.

Sooy Place Tavern

Pine Tavern aka Sooy Place Tavern (William Augustine Collection – Rutgers University)
Pine Tavern (William Augustine Collection – Rutgers University)

Sooy Place Tavern (aka Pine Tavern)

Only an historic marker remains at the sight of this Tavern. It is located at the intersections of Sooy Place and Powell Place Roads.

The Historic American Building Survey (HABS) has concluded that the earliest part of this building was constructed about 1770. It’s most likely that Nicholas Sooy, according to HABS, was the person who built it. This is doubtful as Nicholas did not purchase the property until 1810, and it is unclear in the deed, if a tavern was included in the purchase. Since Nicholas did own another Tavern in Washington Township, it’s possible he added this tavern to his stable of inns. A Paul Sears Sooy was the owner as early as 1829. He is Nicholas’ youngest son. In his will of 1815, Nicholas does mention that he resides in this tavern.

HABS goes on to say that it originally had two rooms on its first and second floors. A later addition contained had four rooms, again, two on each floor.

In 1866 it was sold to Benjamin Woodruff and until 1939 there were nine different owners.

Let’s explore some of the documentation we have uncovered.

From: 1810 Deed, Book V1, page 569 – (Burlington County deeds)

In a deed dated the 26th of March in 1810 Revel and Sarah Elton sold part of a 365-acre parcel to Nicholas Sooy. The selling price was $2025.00, and the property was then located in Northampton Township. The plot contained some 252 acres. It is supposed that later 91 acres were deeded to someone else. perhaps one of the many children of Nicholas Sooy.

The Eltons acquired the property in 1806 when executors Hudson and Leach Burr as well as William Irick, sold the land on behalf of the estate of Joseph Burr. It also appears that John Burr had the land surveyed (Book BB, page 90, which has not yet been located).

Here is the first page of the deed.

1810 deed Revel and Sarah Elton to Nicholas Sooy – Book V1 Page 569 Burlington County Deeds

From: 1812 Deed, Book Y, page 34 – (Burlington County deeds)

As mentioned in his 1815 will, Nicholas did deed the Tavern and its surrounding land to his son Josephus. On August 1, 1812, for a nominal sum of $200.00, he sold 250 acres to his son Josephus. In the deed it mentions that the land originally came from the executors of Joseph Burr’s estate. Here is the deed.

Deed Nicholas to Josephus Sooy – Book Y Page 35 – Burlington County deeds

From: 1815 will of Nicholas Sooy.

This will defines how Nicholas wishes his estate to be divided. As we see below, he indicated the Tavern should be “4th: To my son Josephus Sooy I give and bequeath one of my cows and in addition to the plantation and tavern which I purchased of Rever Elton, and for which I have already given him a deed.” While difficult to read, the last four lines show Joseph’s inheritance of the property.

A question to be raised here is who built the tavern. HABS suggests Nicholas Sooy while the will implies it was one Revel Elton.

From: 1826 10 February Joseph Sooy License Application (NJ State Archives)

The NJ State Archives has many license applications of tavern owners. Most all are from the 1800’s. Throughout this article we will cite them and list relevant information from them.

The tavern is in Northampton Township. Joseph has been “keeping it” for several years and he has “two feather beds available.” There are thirteen original signers (with original signatures), who are “freeholders.” They are:

?? Woolston                        William Irick

William Red??                     Allen Southwick

Joseph Colkit                        John Haines

George Haines                     Joseph Naylor

Daniel Bodine                      Job ???ggy

Joseph White                       Joseph Warren

John Butterworth  

A Joseph White owned the Kemble Inn (more on this inn later) and a J Naylor appears as a landowner on what may have been the site of Naylor’s Tavern.

1826 10 February Joseph Sooy License Application (NJ State Archives)

From: 1828 Gordon’s map

Gordon’s first map of the area shows “Pine,” the early name for the Sooy Place Hotel. It also appears to show a building at this location. Note what appears to be a road going from Pine up to Burr’s Mill.

1828: Thomas Gordon – Map, State of New Jersey (Princeton University)

From: 1839 geological map

Pine is again noted with what appears to be a structure.

1839 Geological Map

From: 1844 map of New Jersey (NJ State Archives)

An 1844 map clearly shows the tavern at the intersection of five roads. They are: Friendship Mill – Johnson Place Roads, today’s Powell Place Road. Today’s Sooy Place and South Park Roads and a road which went from the tavern up to Burr’s Mill. Josephus Sooy is noted as the proprietor.

From: 1849 map by Otley and Whiteford (Tabernacle Historical Society Collection)

By 1849 a few more buildings appear on the map and the area continues to known as “Pines.” We can see pretty much the same road configuration and the addition of the homestead of one J Hilliard, on the Friendship Mill Road. The cellar hole for this building can be seen today right next to the roadway.

1849: J. Otley and R. Whiteford – Burlington County Rutgers University)

From: 1850 census

The 1850 revels quite a bit. It is the first U. S. Census to list out names of everyone as well as several other items of interest. We can see nine Sooy family members and seven others who are listed as laborers, all apparently living in the same building.  Note the word “hotel” written in the left margin.

1850 Census (Ancestry.com)

From: 1855 15 September Joseph Sooy License Application (NJ State Archives)

The tavern is now in Southampton Township. Josephus Sooy is requesting “a license to keep and Inn and a Tavern in the house wherein he now dwells.” Only one of the 1826 “freeholders” seems to have endorsed this request.

            James Jones                         Guy Bryant

            John Hillard                          William Bareford

            Samuel Peacock                  William Jones

            George Akins                       C A Shinn

            William Irick                         Thomas Haines

Isaac Eayres                         James Logan

From: 1857 14 December Joseph Sooy License Application (NJ State Archives)

Josephus pays $12.00 for his license. The “subscribers, or freeholders” are:

            Guy Bryant                           John Hillard

            Joseph ????                         Samuel Butterworth

            John L ????                          John Woolston

            John Cox                               Charles Haines

            William Jones                      C A Shinn

            Alexander ????                   John Brown

            Kastina Lippencott

From: 1858 map Kuhn and Janney (Library of Congress)

There are two maps, one dated 1858 and the other dated 1859, by R KKuhn and J. D. Janney. The local is labeled “Pine” on both maps and each shows the hotel owned by J. Sooy. However, the 1858 version shows an “A. B. Moore” residing where the 1849 map listed J. Hilliard as the resident.

From: 1859 27 December Joseph Sooy License Application– (NJ State Archives)

The license fee is still $12.00. Interestingly, one attachment to the license states, in part,

That the signing freeholders have not recommended “any other application for a house an inn or tavern therein to sell beers or spirituous liquor.” (See section below) The freeholders are:

            Guy Bryant                           William Jones

            John Haines                          John Woolston

            Charles Jones                       J Jones

            William ????                        Charles Haines

            John Broadwater                Franklin Thomas

            Kastina Lippencott             Les??  Carr

NJ State Archives

From: 1860 Kitchell map

Still called “Pine,” and we can continue to note the road up to Burr’s Mill.

1860: William Kitchell (Princeton University)

From: 1866 Deed, Book N, page 66 – (Burlington County deeds)

When sold by Joseph Sooy to Benjamin Woodruff in 1866, the price for its 161.93 acres was $4250.66. The depth of the lot was over 3000 feet and it ended at Burrs Mill Road.

Burlington County deeds Book N Pages 66-68

From: 1872 Burlington County Topo map

This vividly colored map clearly shows the hotel’s location as well as several other buildings on the site.

1872: Beers Topographical Map of Southern Burlington County (Rutgers University)

From: 1873 Deed, Book V8, page 522 – (Burlington County deeds)

While this deed does not show the transfer of property from Benjamin Woodruff, it does show that Burlington County Sheriff David Hall sold the 161.93 acres to Dewitt Clinton Huff. This seems to have been at the order of the Chancery Court which appeared to be judging on a mortgage default. The sale had been advertised in both the New Jersey Mirror and the Mount Holly Herald for four weeks. It was purchased at an auction for $2200 and note is made that both Josephus Sooy and Dewitt Huff had been owed money.

November 1873 Mount Holly Herald

From: 1876 Scotts Atlas

Still called “Pine,” we see A B Moore living on the road to Friendship. And a P Caldwell has a property across the street.

1876: Historical Atlas of Burlington County by J D Scott

From: 1883 Deed, Book H11, page 489 – (Burlington County deeds)

Once again, the property is sold by Sheriff Hall. It is now in Woodland Township. This time the buyer is Cornelious Waldman of Saratoga County in New York. Again, the Chancery Court ruled on a complicated mortgage default and ordered the Sheriff to sell the property.

From: 1886 Deed, Book M11, page 330 – (Burlington County deeds)

Waldman sells the property to Adam Caldwell of Clifton Park, NY. It appears the listed sale price is $5.00, and this implies some sort of other consideration between the two New York State residents.

From: 1887 Deed, Book Q11, page 41 – (Burlington County deeds)

In this year Isaiah Lemunyon purchases the 161.93 acres for $1000.

From 1888 geological map

This is the first map wherein we see the locale named “Sooy Place.”

1888: George H Cook Geological Survey (Princeton University)

From: 1902 Newspaper Article – 25 March 1902 Mount Holly News

In 1902 Lemunyon was desperate to sell the property. During the course of the year, 20+ ads appeared in the Mount Holly News. They all were identical to the one below.

25 March 1902 Mount Holly Herald

From: 1904 Deed, Book 384, page 135 – (Burlington County deeds)

After 17 years of ownership by Lemunyon, the property passes to Joseph Nider, a Jersey City, NJ, resident. The sale price is $800.

From: 1906 Deed, Book 409 page 441 – (Burlington County deeds)

Joseph Nider to Anthony and Alex Nider. Obviously, both are related to Joseph Nider, but the circumstances or relationship has yet to be located. Selling price is $2500.

From: 1916 Deed, Book 528, page 216 – (Burlington County deeds)

A Special Master, Harold Wells, grants a deed to one John Nider, a Tabernacle Township resident. Again, the Chancery Court had ordered the sale and it was advertised in Mt Holly Newspapers. Sale price was $350 and, it seems, assumption of a $350 mortgage. Here is a newspaper article describing the sale.

July 1916 New Jersey Mirror
11 July 1916 Mount Holly News

From: 1917 Deed, Book 533, page 309 – (Burlington County deeds)

The 161.93-acre property leaves the Nider family and is sold to Antoni Chinstyk for $2000.

From: 1917 Deed, Book 533, page 313 – (Burlington County deeds)

Two days later Antoni Chinstyk quickly sells to John Chinstyk for $1000.

From: 1929 Deed, Book 740, page 211 – (Burlington County deeds)

In the height of the depression there is another Sheriff’s sale via the Common Pleas Court. The buyer is Julius Melcer of Mount Laurel and one Earl Cline. Their winning bid was $900.

May 1929 New Jersey Mirror

From: 1933 Deed, Book 808, page 57 – (Burlington County deeds)

Dorothy Streng, of Camden, NJ, purchases the 161.93 acres from the Melcers and Clines, for the listed price of $1.00.

From: 1933 Deed, Book 808, page 60 – (Burlington County deeds)

Dorthey Streng sells the acreage to Anna Melcer and Liddie Cline.

From: 1935 Deed, Book 837, page 134 – (Burlington County deeds)

Anna Melcer, et al, now sell the property to Dorothy Streng.

From: 1935 Deed, Book 837, page 136 – (Burlington County deeds)

As the flip flopping continues, Dorothy Streng resells the property to Anna Melcer for $1.00. Next see 1959 and after deeds.

From: 1936 Old Inns and Taverns in West Jersey by Charles Boyer

“On the road from Speedwell to Vincentown, at what is now called Sooy Place. Andrew Elverson kept a tavern from 1810 to 1817. This house is still standing, was called the Pine Tavern and was an important stopping place for travelers going to the Speedwell Furnace.”

From: 1939 Historic American Buildings Survey

This fantastic four-page document tells us a lot about the history of the tavern. It is reproduced in its entirety, without the bibliography, to help you understand the written historical record of the site. Below it are several of the pictures and drawings also contained within it. First the report.

Historic American Buildings Survey (NJ State Archives)

The HABS had some 18 or so pictures and drawings within it. Here are a few.

Pines Tavern (Historic American Buildings Survey)
Note the person standing against the right side of the structure.
Bunk room wall and stairs (Historic American Buildings Survey)
Bunk room wall (Historic American Buildings Survey)
Andirons (Historic American Buildings Survey)
First floor plan (Historic American Buildings Survey)
Second floor plan (Historic American Buildings Survey)
Southwest elevation (Historic American Buildings Survey)

From: 1955 Signposts by Henry Bisbee

A direct quote from Henry Bisbee’s book on placenames of Burlington County.

“Located between Friendship and Johnson Place on the eastern border of the Township. Named for J Sooy, who operated the Pine Tavern at this place around 1817. At this date it was known as Pine Tavern, and the 1849 map so notes it. According to Boyer, the tavern was an important stopping place for travelers on their way to Speedwell Furnace.”

From: 1947 Deed, Book 1034, page 453 – (Burlington County deeds)

2.08 acres are sold from the original tract to Alice Hansell by Julius and Anna Melcer.

From: 1959 Deed, Book 1412, page 189 – (Burlington County deeds)

Julius Melcer, now a widower, for $1.00, sells to his nephew Oran Rives, 1.11 acres. This is lot number one of a subdivision approved earlier in the year. Julius had inherited the land after the 1958 death of his wife Anna. The deed notes that this is part of the 161 acres of land Anna Melcer purchased from Dorothy Streng in 1935.

From: 1959 Deed, Book 1412, page 193 – (Burlington County deeds)

Julius Melcer, now a widower, for $1.00, sells to his nephew Carlton Rives, 1.12 acres. This is lot number two of a subdivision approved earlier in the year. Julius had inherited the land after the 1958 death of his wife Anna. The deed notes that this is part of the 161 acres of land Anna Melcer purchased from Dorothy Streng in 1935.

From: 1962 Deed, Book 1507, page 869 – (Burlington County deeds)

Julius Melcer and his new wife Elsie sell for $1.00, 3.834 acres, to Frederick Gall. The deed notes that this is part of the 161 acres of land Anna Melcer purchased from Dorothy Streng in 1935.

From: 1962 Deed, Book 1507, page 869 – (Burlington County deeds)

Julius and Elsie sell the rest of the 161.93 acres to Hyman Frank.

From: 1949 (February 24) Central Record article.

On a cold February Friday, in the evening hours, an overheated “chunk burner stove” caused a fire which all but destroyed the Sooy Place Inn. Here is the story as told in the Central Record.

1949 24 February (Central Record)

Tracing which of the previous parcel sales from the original 161.93 acres to determine which lot the Sooy Place Hotel can be done by looking at current tax maps and trying to line up lot sizes with the suspected location of the Tavern. It may be a future endeavor, but for now we need to move onto the next Tavern

Fox Chase Tavern

Built prior to 1800 by William Fox. By 1837 Hosea Moore was the owner. It caught fire and burned in theFrom:1840 map mid 1950’s. Virgil and Helen O’Neal were living there at the time. The building site is at the intersections of Carranza and Hawkin Roads and was approximately where the Seneca tennis courts are now located.

From:1844 era map

This early map by an unknown publisher designates several Tabernacle area properties. Hosea Moore is noted as the owner, but he had died in 1838. Note how today’s Hawkin Road (Once Manahawkin Road) angles into today’s Carranza Road (once Red Lion Road).

1844: Approximate date, cartographer unknown

From: 1849 Otley map

This map does not exactly match the previous location, but that is not unusual for cartographers to get it wrong, they often copied form other maps and misplaced items. Also, it this map, north is to the left, confusing things even more.

1849: J. Otley and R. Whiteford – Burlington County Rutgers University)

From: 1850 Census

As we might expect in 1850 Aaron Moore is the tavern owner. He is 40 years of age while his wife Acsah is only 26. Three children are with them. Mary is 6, Alfred is 5 and Adalade is 4. Son Charles, born in 1849, has passed away by the time the census was recorded. Surprisingly, the listed value of the hotel is $40,000, a staggering sum for that time.

From: 1855 7 April Aaron B Moore Tavern License application

All license applications have pretty much identical verbiage. The difference seems to be in the names of those signing the petition. Here is a complete version, not to be repeated later, unless there are major changes.

“To the judges of the court of Common Pleas, in the County of Burlington, April 10, 1855. The subscriber hereby requests the said judges to grant him a license to keep and inn and a tavern in the house wherein he now dwells in the Township in the Township of Southampton in the County of Burlington. Dated April 7, 1855. Aaron B Moore.”

We the subscribers, Freeholders of the Township of Southampton in the County of Burlington; do hereby recommend Aaron B Moore to be licensed to keep an inn and a tavern, in the house wherein he now dwells, in said Township; and we do hereby certify that the said Aaron B Moore is of good repute for honesty and temperance, and is known to each of us to have at least two spare beds more than are necessary for the family’s use, and is well provided with house, room, ***ing and provender: And we do further certify that such tavern is necessary for the accommodations of stranger and traveler and for the transaction of public business and will conduct to the public good.

Dated April 7th, 1855”

The petition is signed by (their actual signatures)

Jervis Butterworth             Benjamin Matlack

Noah Peacock                      Michael Bowker

Daniel Lukic                          William Gaskill

Japhet Woolston                Charles Gaskill

H Kirkbride                           William Banford

Clayton Prickett                  Charles Austin

Isaac Prickett                       William ******

Aaron paid $10.00 for his license.                    

New Jersey State Archives

From: 1859 Kuhn and Janney

This map is quite interesting as it shows the names of many homeowners. Aaron B Moore now owns the hotel and we get a great glimpse of his neighbors.

1858: R. KKuhn and J. D. Janney (Princeton University)

From: 1860 Kitchell map

While this map does not show owner names, and does not locate the Fox Chase Inn where we expect it to be, the building noted is probably it.

1860: William Kitchell (Princeton University)

From: 1860 Census

Eight children now live in the household. The 1850’s have been a prosperous time for the Moore’s. Six other people also reside in the household, all laborers. Aaron is listed as a master farmer and his property continues to be valued at $40,000.

From: 1869 17 April Aaron B Moore Tavern License application

Fourteen years later the cost of a license is now $12.00. Aaron’s dwelling is mentioned as “Fox Chase.” The date of petition is April 17th, 1869. It looks like we have a whole new set of “Freeholders.” (with very poor penmanship)

David S Scott                       Thos Fitzpatrick

Ridgeway Zelley                  James Nale

Jesse Nale                             John Sowdy

William Lukert                     Job S Scott

Daniel Joice                          Stephen Haines

Samuel Allen                        Samuel DeCou

Jacob Prickett                      Wm H Cook

Henry Weaver

From: 2 April 1870 Aaron B Moore Tavern License application

Aaron resides at the Fox Chase. Cost of his license is still $12.00. Date of application is April 2nd, 1870, and many of the signers are the same.

Japhet Scott                         T Prickett

Wm Cook                              Jervis Butterworth

Joseph Lippincott               Adolphus Hale

Edward Cotton                    Samuel Cline

Henry Weaver                     Amos Wilkins

Thomas Gaskill                    Jesse Nale

From: 1870 Census

Aaron is a farmer, and his property is now valued at $50,000. Eight children and four laborers live onsite.

From: 1871 18 April Aaron B Moore Tavern License application

Requested April 18th, 1871. Signers this year are:

E. W. Haines                         Thomas Gaskill

Allen Joyce                           William Gardner

Jacob Abrams                      Samuel Prickett

Japhet Scott                         Henry Covely

William Branin                    John Poinsett

William Cook                       Samuel Branin

Ira Prickett                           Samuel Prickett

From: 1872 9 April Aaron B Moore Tavern License application

Fee is still $12.00, and his application was made on April 9th, 1872.

This year’s crop of signers are:

George Poinsett                  Henry Weaver

Joseph Lippincott               Samuel Conrow      

Jervis Butterworth             A. S. Wilkins

Amos Wills                           Micah Parman

Samuel Prickett                   Franklin Allen

Edmund Prickett                 Japhet Scott

From: 1873 Aaron B Moore Tavern License application

On the 15th of April Aaron paid his $12.00 to renew his license.

Supporting his effort were:

Samuel Branin                     Jacob Abrams

George Taylor                      William Branin

Barclay Phillips                    John Poinsett

Wm Marles                          Clayton Wilkins

S Prickett                              Budd S?????

Thomas Gaskill                    Edmund ?????

Henry Covely                        Michael Forman

From: Scott’s 1876 Atlas

Aron Moore’s land is now known as Fox Chase Farm. While it does not show on he cutout presented here, Hawkin Road is labeled “Ridge Road,” and Powell Place Road is named “Friendship Mill Road.”

1876: Historical Atlas of Burlington County by J D Scott

From: 1936 Old Inns and Taverns in West Jersey by Charles Boyer

“On the road from Red Lion to Tabernacle, about three miles from the former place. It was opened about the end of the eighteenth century but, so far, the earliest proprietor known to have been there was William Fox. It was best known when Hosea Moore conducted it.”

Fox Chase Tavern in the 1930’s

Nate Ewan photo, date unknown

From: 1955 Signposts by Henry Bisbee

“A hamlet on the road from Red Lion to the village of Tabernacle in northern part of township. Named for William Fox, who operated a Fox Chase Tavern here in late eighteenth century. In 1838 timber was advised for sale at Fox Chase. A continuation of the name was in effect when A. B. Moore named his farm Fox Chase as shown on 1860 map.”

Fox Chase Tavern after the 1950’s fire

Tabernacle Historical Society photo

Eagle Hotel

In 1799 Gideon Pharo was the operator. And in 1826 James  McCambridge became the owner as he acquired this and many acres of adjoining land, including Speedwell. It is located on the once busy road today known as Eagle Road. Only a historical marker notes its location.

From: 1783 Property deed – Book C2 pages 359-360

On 15 December 1783, Joseph Smith sold property to Jacob Barnhart. Joseph Smith had obtained the land from the Council of Proprietors.  The property was on the “east side of the road from Robbins Meadow to Tulepehocking Bridge and a little to the south of a road leading from Randolph’s Mill to Tulepehocking Cedar Swamp.” The sale price was “twenty pounds gold or silver.” The lot size is 100 acres.

From: 1812 Watson’s map of New Jersey

In this statewide map we can drill down and note that a “Barnhardt” owns a property just a bit northwest of Speedwell.

1812: William Watson Wall Map (Princeton University)

From: 1815 Property deed – Book D2 pages 86-88

On October 6, 1815, Jacob Barnhart sold this property to John Shields. Both parties lived in Washington Township. The price was $1000. The property was on the (see above) “east side of the road from Robbins Meadow to Tulepehocking Bridge and a little to the south of a road leading from Randolph’s Mill to Tulepehocking Cedar Swamp.” It is the same land that Jacob Barnhart purchased from Joseph Smith on 15 December 1783.

From: 1849 Otley map

Big and bold, we see the hotel designated as “Old Eagle Hotel,” perhaps indicating it is no longer in use and maybe in ruins. James J McCambridge is noted as the “proprietor.” Note howthere is a “loop” around the property and that roads to Apple Pie Hill and Speedwell are designated.

1849: J. Otley and R. Whiteford – Burlington County Rutgers University)

From: 1859 Kuhn and Janney map

Jas McCambridge is shown as the proprietor of the Eagle Hotel. It’s located on the “Speedwell tract.”

1858: R. KKuhn and J. D. Janney (Princeton University)

From: 1860 Kitchell map

Although the map on says “hotel,” it is exactly where previous maps have shown it.

1860: William Kitchell (Princeton University)

From: 1872 Burlington County Topo map

This map documents the existence of the hotel. Clearly marked, the “Eagle Hotel” is to the west of Speedwell.

1872: Beers Topographical Map of Southern Burlington County (Rutgers University)

From: 1878 statewide map

Six years after the prior map, this document also lists the “Eagle Hotel.”

1878: C. B. Coulton, Map, State of New Jersey (Rutgers University)

From: 1889 geological map

As the 1888 geological map, and the 1889 Kobbe map show, Eagle is now just a placename on maps.

1889: Geological Map of New Jersey 1858: (Rutgers University)

From: 1936 Old Inns and Taverns in West Jersey by Charles Boyer

“One of the noted taverns of the pine belt was old Eagle Tavern, situated midway between the White Horse (Paisley) and Washington. The first tavern keeper, as far as is known, was Gideon Pharo, who was licensed in 1798. In the road returns for Burlington County for 1799, is a record of a road “beginning at the center of a public road leading from EayreTown to Tulpehawken, a short distance southwest of the public house of Gideon Pharow.” In 1810 Jacob Barnhart became the landlord and the house became known as Barnhart’s Tavern. John Shield followed Barnhart, but was only here for one year, when Abner Cross, a former workman at Martha Furnace, became the lessee. James McCambridge in 1826, announced that “he now dwells at that old and noted stand known by the name of Barnhart’s Tavern.” He kept this tavern for a number of years and soon became the owner of much of the adjacent land, including the famous Speedwell Furnace property. On a map of Burlington County, published in 1849, this tavern is marked “Old Eagle Tavern,” but by that time it had been abandoned, although the name was still retained.”

From: 1955 Signposts by Henry Bisbee

Site of the Eagle Hotel, located on the old road from White Horse to Washington in the southeast corner of the township. Hotel was owned by James McCambridge prior to 1849 and was much frequented by visitors to Speedwell nearby. McCambridge probably named his hotel after the Eagle tract which is mentioned in a 1786 survey. From 1810 to 1826, the hotel was run by Jacob Barnhart. An 1831 survey mentions ‘road from Jacob Barnhart’s Tavern Tulepenhocken.”

Whip Poor Will House

Other than its location on an 1876 map, just north of Medford Lakes Road and east of Allen’s Court, nothing else is known about the site.

In 1990 it was evaluated in a Cultural Resource Study authorized by the Pinelands Commission.

“Neither the 1849 map of Burlington County or the 1859 counterpart show any structures in the vicinity of the project site. These, however, do show a similar pattern of roads. The 1876 map of the three Townships locate both Tabernacle and Flyatt Road. This map also indicates that there was a structure east of Flyatt Road known as The Whip Poor Will House.”

“What was Flyatt Road is now known as Prickett’s Mill Road. Prickett’s Mill once lay to the northwest of the project site at what is known as Chairville. Flyatt was a tavern location to the southwest of the project site.”

“The Whip Poor Will House was not on the project site, but rather to the immediate southeast. As noted by the 1876 map, Flyatt and Whip Poor Will House were in separate locations. The 1919 Geological Survey of New Jersey Map shows the area of The Whip Poor Will House as an open field. The area is now a sand and gravel pit.”

“During the literature search, no documentation was found for The Whip Poor Will House. Neither Beck or Bisbee mentioned it, nor is it mentioned in the Nat Ewan scrapbooks now at the Burlington County Library.”

“No evidence of structures was found in the written or cartographic references. No structures or ruins were found on the project site during the pedestrian survey.”

1876: Historical Atlas of Burlington County by J D Scott

Naylor’s Tavern

The former building stood until about 1975, when it burned and was destroyed. Its location is at the intersections of Old Indian Mills and Tuckerton Roads. No sure-fire confirmation of its use as a hotel has yet been found, and some experts question if indeed this building was ever a hotel. Often, this same intersection is referred to as “Oriental.”

Source unknown

From: Gordon’s 1833 map

A miniscule spec on the site where the building lies, indicates the building’s presence in 1833. There is no indication it was a hotel.

1833: Thomas Gordon – Map, State of New Jersey (Princeton University)

From: 1858 Kuhn map

A J. Naylor owns the building depicted. But once again it is not noted as a hotel. Whereas Pettit’s Hotel in nearby Flyatt is labeled as a hotel.

1858: R. KKuhn and J. D. Janney (Princeton University)

1876 Scott’s Atlas

J. B. Naylor is listed as the owner of this property, but again there is no designation that it was a hotel.

1876: Historical Atlas of Burlington County by J D Scott

From: 1955 Signposts by Henry Bisbee

“Boyer is silent about there ever being a tavern at this place which rules out an Oriental Hotel.”

Hampton Gate Tavern

In 1820 Daniel Cavileer opened this tavern. After he passed, his wife became the operator. In 1849 a J Smith took over. Its exact location on Carranza Road is unknown. It is said to have been a “stone” tavern, but no evidence seen yet confirms this.

A thorough study of all available maps may eventually provide the answer.

From: 1813 land survey

While the Tavern and the turning mill are not shown on this map, we can clearly see where the Green Limb Branch meets the Batsto River. This is the area where both were built in a later year.

From: 1820 deed William Wilkins estate to David Cavileer (Book N2 Page 548)

While not thoroughly verified, this 10.46-acre parcel is along Carranza Road and seems to be right at Hampton Gate. The estate of William Wilkins sells it to Daniel Cavileer.

From: 1828 Gordon map

The 1828 version of Gordon’s map shows a structure south of Carranza Road (then Hampton Gate Road)

1828: Thomas Gordon – Map, State of New Jersey (Princeton University)

From: Gordon’s 1833 map update

This map is very similar to the above but seems to show a road from Hampton Gate up to Irick’s Causeway Road and on to Sooy Place (Pine).

1833: Thomas Gordon – Map, State of New Jersey (Princeton University)

From: 1839 Geological Survey map

Again we see what appears to be a road heading north up to the intersections of today’s Route 532 and Patty Bowker Roads. The hotel is barely marked just south of Carranza Road.

From: 1844 map

The unknown cartographer of this circa 1844 map places a structure north of the main road from Tabernacle.

From: 1849 Otley and Whiteford map

A J Smith is noted as the hotel’s owner. This would be Josiah Smith, whose son John took over operations in the mid 1850’s. While no connection has yet been found, it is strongly suspected that Josiah was related to David Cavileer, initial owner of the Tavern.

1849: J. Otley and R. Whiteford – Burlington County Rutgers University)

From:1850 Kirkbride Directory

Josiah Smith is listed as a Hotel Proprietor on Tuckerton Road, along with William Sinclair and Johanthan Cramer. Sinclair and Cramer are probably owners somewhere along the Tuckerton Road.

From: 1850 census

Josiah Smith (age 70) is a hotel keeper. With him are several other Smiths who appear to be children and grandchildren. They are Sarah (35), John (22), Maryann (18), William (18) and Kesiah Mingin (85). Note that George Wills is also a “hotel keeper,” more likely than not residing in the same building as Josiah.

From: 1856 15 April John P Smith Tavern License application

On April 15th, John P Smith asks to keep a tavern in his house, in Shamong Township, where he resides. Sixteen signers are required. They are:

                  William Keeler                     Thomas Carmeley

                  Asa Smith                             John ????

                  Samuel Leeds                      George Hagerty

                  Nathan Wright                    Josiah ????

                  Joseph Small                        George Lee

                  John Naylor                          William Woolman

                  Daniel Doughty                   Mahlon Pettit

                  Joseph ????                         ????

                  Jonathan ?ovy                     William Richards

                  Joseph Horner                     James Geary

                  Isaiah Smith                         John Sorden

                  ?? Campbell                         Barzilliu Thompson           

From: 1857 23 March John P Smith Tavern License application

Fee of $12.00 is paid by John P Smith. Fourteen signers are required. They are:

                  Isaiah Smith                         William Richards

                  Daniel Sinclair                      Patrick Millay

                  Harry Mingin                       Michael Milley

                  Ada Smith                             Eliz Naylor

                  Daniel Smith                        Oliver Wiltsee

                  William Kuler                       Allen Basell

                  Edward McIntyre                Samuel Scott

                  John Kellman                       John Sprawls

Benjamin Small                   John Branin

Mathias Cotner                   William Cotton

Joseph Mingin                     John Sordon

Jonathan Hartman

From: 1859 15 March John P Smith Tavern License application

This years’ freeholder signatures are:

  Joseph Munyon                  E Thompson

  Patrick Millay                       Joseph Thompson

  John Milbine                        Daniel Sinclair

Jonathan Hartman             William Richards

Mathias Cotner                   Benjamin Small

John Sordon                         Daniel Mcneel        

Nathan Wright

From: 1860 16 April John P Smith Tavern License application

Signing for the 1860 license are:

                  E Thompson                         Edward McIntyre

                  Daniel Sinclair                      John  ????

                  Mathias Cotner                   Benjamin Small

                  J Thompson                          William Richards

                  J Hartman                             Joseph Small

                  John Kellman                       John Miller

                  Joseph LeMunyon              John Sordon

                  Frances Mingen

From 1858 Kuhn and Janney map

Another map which shows the Hotel north of the roadway. Below the roadway is a house owned by a “Flemmers.” This most likely is “Flemming.”

1858: R. KKuhn and J. D. Janney (Princeton University)

From: 1860 Kitchell map

A statewide map in which you can barely see the word “hotel” at the site of Hampton Furnace. Nevertheless, it is another solid indicator of the hotel’s existence and location.

1860: William Kitchell (Princeton University)

From: the 1860 census

John P Smith is a farmer with an estate valued at $2325.00 and personal estate valued at $1500. Living with him are a Sarah Smith as well as the George and Mary Bozarth family (with child Ellis).

From: 1862 (circa) Washington Township map

In this map several buildings adjoin the hotel. In addition to a large building, there are seven outbuildings.

1862: Map of Washington Township, Burlington County (Burlington County Historical Society)

From: 1870 census

John P Smith is a laborer living with the Wright family. While Wright is a farmer, his real estate value of $16,000 suggests he could also be a hotel owner.

From: 1872 Burlington County Topo map

This highly colored topo map clearly shows Hampton Gate and it is notable that there is no designation of a hotel there.

1872: Beers Topographical Map of Southern Burlington County (Rutgers University)

From: 1876 Scott’s Atlas map

The hotel is shown south of the road and the area is noted as “Atsion property.”

1876: Historical Atlas of Burlington County by J D Scott

From: 1880 census

John P Smith is 54 years old and resides with his brother-in-law Thomas Crain. While Thomas is a farmer, John is a carpenter. This census to definitely suggest John is far removed from the hotel business. Yet a John Arnett, living in a nearby household, is a hotel keeper.

From: 1889 geological map

As in the 1878 statewide map, and the later 1888 Kobbel map, this map shows only a placename. There is no indication of a hotel.

1889: Geological Map of New Jersey 1858: (Rutgers University)

From: 1936 Old Inns and Taverns in West Jersey by Charles Boyer

“Soon after the furnace at Hampton in Washington Township was built, a tavern was opened a few miles away, at a place called “The Gate.” The first tavern keeper at this house was probably Daniel Cavileer, who was here until 1824, when he was succeeded by his widow Mary.”

From: 1955 Signposts by Henry Bisbee

“Site of a tavern called The Gate, which was built soon after the furnace began operation. It was located a few miles north of the iron works. Daniel Cavileer and later his widow operated the tavern till 1824.”

Kemble Inn

In 1845 this structure was owned by Charles Kemble. In addition to his innkeeping, Charles was also a blacksmith and farmer. He also served as a member of the NJ State Assembly and the Sheriff of Burlington County.

Some reports indicate the building was known as the Half Moon Tavern in 1800, and later as the Seven Stars Tavern. Its location is on Carranza Road, adjacent to the Russo’s Farm Market.

From: 1833 Gordon’s Map

While not marked as a hotel, the building does show on both of Gordon’s maps. Next to it, on the corner of the intersection, is another building.

1833: Thomas Gordon – Map, State of New Jersey (Princeton University)

From: 1839 Geological Survey map

A building shows at the spot of the Kemle Inn, but again there is no designation of a hotel.

From: 1844 State Map

This map has hand drawn images where houses/buildings are placed. While not labeled as an “Inn,” it clearly is the building for which Charles Kemble obtained a hotel license. In 1844 it seems to be owned by an Alanson White.

1844: Approximate date, cartographer unknown

From 1849 Otley Map

A C. Kemble is now clearly the hotel owner. We also continue to see a building on the corner of the intersection.

1849: J. Otley and R. Whiteford – Burlington County (Rutgers University)

From: 1850 census

Charles Kemble is a farmer whose estate is worth $2500. With him are his wife Sarah and three children. They are Matilda (age 7), Henry (age 5) and Eldridge (age 1).

From: 1855 Charles Kemble Tavern License application

Charles paid $12.00 for his license at “the Tabernacle” in Shamong Township. Fourteen “subscribers” attested Mr. Kemble’s worthiness. They are:

            Charles Bowker                   Wesley Taylor

            Ebenezer Davis                    Eli Bowker

            John Alloway                        Henry Smith

            Caleb Wright                       Henry Kemble

            Benjamin Willets                Isaac Cramer

Joseph Houston                  Hosea Moore

John White

From: 1856 Charles Kemble Tavern License application

After another annual $12.00 fee, another license is granted at “the Tabernacle in the township of Shamong.”. Eli Bowker testifies that one “freeholder,” Stephen Haines, is not a resident of the township (Shamong). The complete list of signers is:

            Wesley Taylor                     Henry Kemble

            Henry Smith                         Ebenezer Davis

            Eli Bowker                             John Alloway

            Joshua Jones                        Gilbert Swain

            Caleb Wright                       Joel Carmely

            Josiah Huston                                  Stephen Haines

            Benjamin Willets                William Carmely

1856 “freeholders”

From: 1857 6 April Charles Kemble Tavern License application

Those signing this year are:

            Wesley Taylor                      Ebenezer Davis

            Caleb Wright                       James Tetlow

            Eli Bowker                             John Foster

            Benjamin Willets                Benjamin M????

            Henry Smith                         Aaron Doughty

            Henry Kemble                      Marmaduke Alloway

            Josiah Huston

From: 1858 Kuhn and Janney

The hotel is shown with ownership by C. Kemble.

1858: R. KKuhn and J. D. Janney (Princeton University)

From: 1858 20 Mar Charles Kemble Tavern License application

Signed by:

            Nathan Wright                    Gilbert Swain

            George Scott                       Wesley DeCou

            Eli Bowker                             Isaiah Haines

            Henry Kemble                      Henry Smith

            Joel Carmaleys                     Caleb Wright

            James Tetlow                       Josiah Huston

            Wesley Taylor                      Benjamin Willets

From: 1859 19 Mar Charles Kemble Tavern License application

This years’ license fee is only $10.00!! Freeholders signing the petition are:

Josiah Huston                      Joshua Jones

Benjamin Willets                Henry Smith

William Carmelle                Henry Kemble

Wesley DeCou                     Gilbert Swain

Isaac Cramer                        John Alloway

Ezekiel Wright                     Eli Cramer

Joel Carmelle

From: 1860 Census

Charles is a 40-year-old farmer whose real estate is valued at $7200. All the children are in the home. The oldest is Matilda at 17, while youngest is Charles Jr. at 3 months.

From: 1860 17 April Charles Kemble Tavern License application

Charles’ annual tavern fee is still $10.00. The petition is endorsed by:

            Eli Bowker                             John Alloway

            George Wills                        Wesley Taylor

            James Tetlow                       Henry Kemble

            Caleb Wright                       Josiah Houston

            Westley DeCou                   Wm Carmelle

            Josiah Haines                       Aaron Doughty

            Joel Carmeley                      Gilbert Swain

From: 1865 New Jersey Census

There are now nine members in the household, but we are not given the relationships between them. However, Charles, Sarah, Matilda, Henry and Eldridge are there. The others are aged 5 (Charles Jr.), 11 (Annie), 9 (Joseph) and 13 (Caroline).

From: 1866 Talbot and Blood Directory

Three hotel owners are shown in “Shomong.” Chas. L Kemble is one of them.

From: 1870 census

This census provides us with a little more information. Charles is now the Burlington County Sheriff, and his property is worth some $8000. Son Henry is a clerk in the Sheriff’s Office while the four youngest children attend school. Matilda is not at home because she has married to a neighbor, Charles Wisham. Since the family now resides in Northampton Township, we know another owner has possession of the Inn.

From: 1876 Scott’s Atlas

Clearly shown on this map, the inn may have a different owner or just an additional initial to Kemble’s name. It reads “S. C. Kemble.”

1876: Historical Atlas of Burlington County by J D Scott

R Franzen Photo

Summary of property ownership going back to 1809

Deed: Joseph White to Charles Kemble (Book W6 Page 547). Signed in 1863 this does appear to be in conflict with when Charles Kemble operated the Inn. It may be as simple as Kemble rented the property until its purchase.

The property description mentions Hampton Road as a boundary, as well as the Tabernacle property. It contains 25 acres of land, and this may have been a consolidation of three lots.

Deed: Samuel and Elizbeth White to Joseph White (Book W6 Page 549). Signed in 1858, it is the same property description as the 1863 deed.

White Horse Tavern

In 1785 a Lewis Mingin is the Tavern Keeper and by 1824 it is Noah Sooy. The site is located close to the infamous land scandal known as Paisley. At one point the Tavern may also have been know as Robins Meadow Tavern.

Nothing can be seen at the site today. In fact, its exact location is currently unknown. It is in the area of Chatsworth Road (Route 532) and the Bordentown Gun Club. Its curious to note that a tavern of the same name exists in Chatsworth and the connection between the two is not known. The tavern in Chatsworth, though, was built many years later during the time of the railroad era.

From 1828 Gordon’s map

A very small mark on the map shows the hotel just north of the Robbin’s Branch. It does appear to be north of South Park Road, prior to the intersection with today’s Chatsworth Road.

1828: Thomas Gordon – Map, State of New Jersey (Princeton University)

From: 1833 Gordon’s map

The tavern site is marked clearly on the 1833 Gordon’s map. It’s on the north side of a road leading up to Hedger House.

1833: Thomas Gordon – Map, State of New Jersey (Princeton University)

From: 1839 geological map

Again, “White Horse,” is shown on today’s South Park Road, a bit north of Robin’s Branch and Chatsworth Road.

From: 1844 Map

The hand drawn hotel adds a nice character to the hotel’s depiction on this early map.

1844: Approximate date, cartographer unknown

From 1849 Otley Map

On this map the direction “east” is at the top and “north” is at the bottom. The hotel is clearly labeled as is a structure across the street from it.

1849: J. Otley and R. Whiteford – Burlington County (Rutgers University)

From: 1858 Kuhn and Janney Map

Again, the hotel is clearly noted as is a second nearby building.

1849: J. Otley and R. Whiteford – Burlington County (Rutgers University)

From:1860 Kitchell map

This statewide map, when expanded greatly, does show the White Horse Hotel.

1860: William Kitchell (Princeton University)

From: 1862 Washington Township Map

Standing alone all by itself is the White Horse Inn. This crudely drawn map of the old Washington Township, seems to have place the Inn rather randomly and approximately where it stood.

1862: Map of Washington Township, Burlington County (Burlington County Historical Society)

From: 1872 Burlington County topo map

The vivid colors of this map highlight the existence of the hotel as well as its potential location. It seems to be on South Park Road just a tad north of today’s Route 532.

1872: Beer’s Topographical Map of Southern Burlington County (Rutgers University)

From: 1876 Scott’s Atlas

Surprisingly, no hotel shows on the site. But we do see the name of James Dellett, believed to once be the owner of the Inn.

1876: Historical Atlas of Burlington County by J D Scott

From: 1878 Map

The hotel is strongly noted on this map. We also see a few other nearby buildings. While the land fraud scheme of Paisley has not yet begun, there does seem to be a building in the Paisley area.

1878: C. B. Coulton, Map, State of New Jersey (Rutgers University)

From: 1887 Geological Map

White Horse is shown as a place name, but no building is shown. Map not added to this page.

From: 1889 Kobbe map

Again, only a place name is shown. Map not added to this page.

From: 1889 Geological Survey Map

If you look closely, an apparent building is depicted at the hotel site on a road leading up to Hedger House. Pehaps the cartographer got his information from an earlier map, because by this time the hotel was probably in ruins.

1889: Geological Map of New Jersey 1858: (Rutgers University)

From: Various 1888 deeds re Paisley and H. L. Freeman

In several of Freeman’s acquisition deeds for his Paisley land scheme, we see many references to the White Horse Tavern. They are couched in terms of landmarks which signify property boundaries. We read the following “Goes along the road where the Old White Horse formerly stood,” “Where the Old White Horse Tavern formerly stood,” “Goes along the road from the Old White Horse Place to Sooy Place,” and, “Old Sooy Place to White Horse.” So, by 1888 the Tavern was long gone.

From: 1936 Old Inns and Taverns in West Jersey by Charles Boyer

“At the intersection of the road from Vincentown to Speedwell with the one from Red Lion to Manahawkin, was an early tavern. Lewis Mingin is the earliest known tavern keeper at this house and was licensed in 1785 and in 1824, was succeeded by Noah Sooy. It is sometimes referred to as ‘the White Horse Tavern commonly called Robbins Meadows.”

From: 1955 Signposts by Henry Bisbee

“Boyer tells us that the White Horse Tavern was established in 1785. He also sttes that the place was “Commonly called Robbins Meadows.” Charles Boyer was a careful researcher; however, this writer offers a possible correction. In the 1831 road returns reference is made to a road “from Goose Pond to Alanson White’s Tavern.” The only road from Goose Pond, (1859 map) at that time, is directly to White House Hotel. Yet earlier maps and all later maps name the place White Horse.

“Robbins Meadows, after Tom Roberts of New Hanover for whom Robert’s Branch is named.”