Historical Churches

Tabernacle Methodist Church

Methodist Church
Tabernacle Methodist Church ( built about 1880)(Society picture)

The following article was written for the 2001 Tabernacle Centennial Celebration. It is reproduced as originally prepared by a member of the Methodist Church. If you would like to add to this please let us know.

Church of Christ

Church of Christ (built about 1916)(Society reprint)

The following article was written for the 2001 Tabernacle Centennial Celebration. It is reproduced as originally prepared by a member of the Church of Christ If you would like to add to this please let us know.

African Methodist Episcopal Church

On October  13th 1868, John Gray and his wife Mary Ann sold a small piece of land in Shamong Township for the total sum of “fifteen dollars current lawful money of the United States.” As recorded in Book C8 Page 607 in the deed books of the Burlington County Clerk’s Office,  the size of the plot was 1.9 acres.

Buyers of the land were the Trustees of the African Methodist Episcopal Church. They were named as George Eayers, David Thompson and Stacey Mires. John Gray also appears to have been a Trustee. The deed goes on to say “come to be erected and built thereon a house of worship for the use of the members of the African Methodist Episcopal church and a part of same shall be used as a burial ground.” Here is the original deed. It is difficult to read and hopefully the highlighted area will make deciphering easier.

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George Eayers is most likely the Civil War Vet buried in the cemetery. You can read about him on the website at (see https://tabernaclehistoricalsociety.org/civil-war-vets/#George-H-Eares).

Here is what may be George’s “muster in” certificate. It’s from Camp William Phinn(?) in Chelton Hills, Pa. While it states he is from Hunterdon County, the name spellings and regiment confirm it is him. It may be “Burlington” was interpreted as “Hunterdon,” when George stated where he was from, or he enlisted on behalf of another person who was from that county.

In the 1880 U.S. Census George Ayres is listed as a farmer, black, living with his three sons, mother and a daughter, in Shamong. Here is a copy of what appears to be some sort of enlistment certificate. While it seems to say he was from Hunterdon County, this probably is either a misinterpretation of what he said, or he truly did enlist there as a paid recruit.

Stacy Mires is listed in the 1865 NJ State Census as “foreign born, colored male.” He may have died in 1878 as there is a will for Stacy I Myers filled with the County Clerk. He cannot be found in any other census and may have come to NJ shortly after the 1870 census.

David Thompson is listed in the 1880 U.S. census. He is listed as a black farmer in Shamong, aged 50. Along with his wife Lucinda, he lives with four sons and three daughters.

John Gray is list in the 1870 census as a black farm laborer and 70 years of age. His wife Mary Ann is “1/2 negro and Indian.” They have two children at home. According to the 1880 Federal Mortality Census Schedule, he died of Tuberculosis in July of 1879.

Below is a picture of the church from our collections. After it is what we believe is the original image. It comes to us from the Scrapbooks of Nate Ewan, in the jersey Room at the Burlington County Library.

African Methodist Church (built prior to 1899)(Society reprint)
From the Nat Ewan Scrapbooks collection

Once located at 324 Carranza Road, now only it’s cemetery remains. We have in our collection a 1938 Works project Administration map which shows the burial site of a Civil War vet (George Eayers) and the foundation of the church. The church was close to Carranza Road, to the left of the Eayers tombstone. Today there is nothing to suggest its former existence. Here is a copy of the map.

1938 WPA Veterans Graveyard map

And finally, George Ayers is not the only vet in the cemetery. Here are some images of gravestones currently visible.

Albert Patterson
Chalmer Gantt
Dallas Cook
Frank Jackson
John Cosby
Louis Chambers

All records we have seen do not show burials more than 50 or so years ago. Since the church/burial ground was established in the 1870’s, it’s likely those records once existed. Hopefully our research will turn them up.

Medford Farms Baptist Church

The following article was written for the 2001 Tabernacle Centennial Celebration. It is reproduced as originally prepared by a member of the Medford Farms Baptist Church. If you would like to add to this please let us know.

Newer Churches

Holy Eucharist Catholic Church

The following article was written for the 2001 Tabernacle Centennial Celebration. It is reproduced as originally prepared by a member of the Holy Eucharist Catholic Church. If you would like to add to this please let us know.

Lord of Life Lutheran Church

The following article was written for the 2001 Tabernacle Centennial Celebration. It is reproduced as originally prepared by a member of the Lord of Life Lutheran Church. If you would like to add to this please let us know.

Tabernacle Baptist Church

Other than pictures of this church, we have no further information. It is located at 141 Flyatt Road.

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